School Refusal

Sorry for the long delay between posts here… summer has been busier than anticipated. Now, I know we are only halfway through our nice break, but there may be some people out there who are worried about fall already. Kids having too much fun over the summer and don’t want to get back into learning mode?

See the attached .PDF for information about school refusal.

school refusal handout

Word Retrieval Info for Parents

“Word retrieval” has become a pretty common term in schools and households.
Ever have a really tough time coming up with the word for something? You know… that thing with the… um… you know what I mean!

Please check out the attached handout for tips for helping your child get through these difficulties… and for just a little more information on the topic. Enjoy.

Understanding Word-Retrieval Problems

Teaching the importance of data

Sometimes we all forget how important clear, undisputed data can be. We are often unaware of the progress that our children (or ourselves) have made. Keeping data and charting that information helps us remain aware of improvements. More importantly, creating progress charts helps prove to ourselves that our hard work is paying off.

I’ve found that teaching elementary students how to complete charts and allowing them to pick any specific skill area (I.e., # of free throws made out of 20 attempts, or typing words per minute) promotes a positive mindset, confidence, and a generally positive skill that we should all remember to use. I made a simple hart in Word and distributed it to a counseling group I met with and found marked improvements in every single.glen student. I encourage you all to pick one area, create a plan on how to improve it, and chart your progress. You will likely be amazed at how much your hard work pays off. I’d be happy to provide further information about how to do this, how to calculate percentage of growth, or anything else you’d like. Good luck!

progresschart

Common Core Curriculum?

I’m sure all you parents and teachers have had enough talk about the educational system and common core curriculum… but a lot of people out there have no clue what this actually looks like. EngageNY has lesson plans and assessments that assess essentially every learning standard at each grade level. Check them out here:

http://www.engageny.org/english-language-arts

Sitting with Swag = Less Stress?

Need to reduce some stress and feel more control? Sit like you own the place.

While research may not always share the most applicable or functional findings, the article below gives us a quick, easy way to possibly improve our emotional well-being: sit like a boss.

http://m.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-winner-effect/201306/can-your-posture-make-you-feel-in-control-and-less-stressed

Data-Driven Learning

Sometimes we all forget how important clear, undisputed data can be. We are often unaware of the progress that our children (or ourselves) have made. Keeping data and charting that information helps us remain aware of improvements. More importantly, creating progress charts helps prove to ourselves that our hard work is paying off.

I’ve found that teaching elementary students how to complete charts and allowing them to pick any specific skill area (I.e., # of free throws made out of 20 attempts, or typing words per minute) promotes a positive mindset, confidence, and a generally positive skill that we should all remember to use. I made a simple chart in Word (see link below) and distributed it to a counseling group I met with and found marked improvements in every student.

I encourage you all to pick one area, create a plan on how to improve it, and chart your progress. You will likely be amazed at how much your hard work pays off. I’d be happy to provide further information about how to do this, how to calculate percentage of growth, or anything else you’d like. Good luck!

progresschart